Fellows

“Know thyself.” Not so easy, says CASBS Fellow David Dunning

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Wed, 04/16/2014

David Dunning’s work is featured in three articles across three different media this week: The Christian Science Monitor newspaper, The Atlantic magazine, and the Smart Planet blog. All cite the Dunning-Kruger effect, as it’s known: the tendency to overestimate one’s competence (and as it happens, the less competent someone is, the greater the likelihood of overestimating their abilities).

CASBS Fellow Heather Munroe-Blum Receives Canada’s Top Award in Public Policy

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Fri, 04/11/2014

Above Left to Right; The Hon. Robert Ghiz, Premier of Prince Edward Island; Heather Munroe-Blum; David Mitchell, President and CEO of the Public Policy Forum. Photo Credit: Martin Lipman

"Representation In Scientific Practice Revisited:" A fresh approach to visualization practices in the sciences. Steve Woolgar, ed.

in
Date: 
Thu, 04/03/2014

Editor’s note: Steve Woolgar will present a paper at UC Berkeley on April 10. The paper, “It Could Be Otherwise,” is based on work he is developing at CASBS.

image of book cover: Representation in Scientific Practice RevisitedCASBS Fellow Steve Woolgar is one of the editors of the recently-released Representation in Scientific Practice Revisited. The original Representation in Scientific Practice, was published by the MIT Press in 1990, the work helped coalesce a long-standing interest in scientific visualization among historians, philosophers, and sociologists of science.

Pest Strips: Sure, They Kill Bedbugs – But What Are They doing to Your Family?

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Date: 
Tue, 04/01/2014

CASBS Fellow Paul Blanc, MD writes a regular online column, Household Hazards, in Psychology Today. This article reports on “pest strips” – whose toxicity extends far beyond the bedbugs and other undesirables they’re intended to kill.

The Centers for Disease Control recently reported on cases of illness not caused by some new super-bug, but rather from a common-enough household product called “pest strips.” These are dichlorvos (DDVP) pesticide-laced (the CDC prefers to say “impregnated”) objects intended to leach out vapors wherever they hang.

Sheri Johnson’s work in The New York Times: some psychiatric disorders related to status seeking

in
Date: 
Wed, 03/12/2014

Sheri Johnson’s work was cited recently in "How Inequality Hollows Out the Soul" in the Opinion pages of The New York Times. From the article:

One of the well-known costs of inequality is that people withdraw from community life and are less likely to feel that they can trust others…. Inequality is divisive and socially corrosive — but that it also damages the individual psyche.

Just published: "Making the American Century," edited by Bruce Schulman

in
Date: 
Wed, 03/12/2014

Making the American Century, a new book edited by CASBS Fellow Bruce Schulman, has just come out from Oxford University Press. Among the book’s 15 essays on the political culture of 20th-century America, it includes essays by CASBS Fellows Leslie Berlin (Class of 2013), Liz Borgwardt (Class of 2011), as well as one by Schulman. The book celebrates the career of noted historian and CASBS Fellow David Kennedy (Class of 1987). Of the book, Schulman writes:

CASBS Board Member Ira Katznelson’s Work Cited in Pacific Standard

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Date: 
Thu, 02/27/2014

CASBS Board member Ira Katznelson’s work was cited in Minority Rule: How Labor Unions and Civil Rights Activists Beat the Big Guys in the current issue of Pacific Standard magazine. 

The article offers a five-point lesson around just how an organized minority – be it the Tea Party, southern Democrats, or gun activists – goes about defeating a disorganized majority.

Lee Jussim on stereotypes: his book Social Perception and Social Reality featured in The Atlantic.

in
Date: 
Wed, 02/26/2014

Lee Jussim’s book, Social Perception and Social Reality is featured in Paul Bloom’s “The War on Reason” in the current issue of The Atlantic.

In a wide-ranging article, Bloom takes on what he believes are misinterpretations of neuroscience and social psychology, contesting the view that people are largely irrational and unaware of what influences their decision-making. Demonstrating that some unconscious influence on behavior is statistically significant in the lab, he argues, is a far cry from refuting the existence of willpower, freedom of choice, and rationality.

The Fog of War (On Pests) – Collateral Damage from Biocides

in
Date: 
Wed, 02/26/2014

CASBS Fellow Paul Blanc, MD writes a regular online column, Household Hazards, in Psychology Today. This article takes a look at a rare but devastating lung injury occurring in very young children.

South Koreans have been struggling with a stealth enemy that has penetrated home defenses and lethally attacked innocent civilians.

Sam Fleischacker Named Distinguished Researcher

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Date: 
Wed, 02/26/2014

CASBS Fellow and Professor of Philosophy Sam Fleischacker has been named one of several Researchers of the Year at the University of Illinois at Chicago. Bestowed by the Office of the Vice Chancellor for Research, the honor recognizes “the efforts and commitment of researchers who have demonstrated outstanding research achievements to advance the knowledge in their field of expertise.”

Fleischacker, who won the award in in Art, Architecture, and the Humanities, is a prolific scholar. Over the past three years, he has produced two major books, which bring philosophy to bear upon current societal issues, helping inform political debate.

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