Fellows

Heather Munroe-Blum Appointed Chairperson of Canada Pension Plan Investment Board

in
Date: 
Thu, 06/26/2014

From the press release:

Canada's Finance Minister Joe Oliver announced the appointment of Heather Munroe-Blum as Chair of the Canada Pension Plan Investment Board (CPPIB), effective October 27, 2014.

Dr. Munroe-Blum has served on the Board of Directors of the CPPIB since 2011. Her appointment as Chair is for a three-year term ending on October 26, 2017. Dr. Munroe-Blum became the first woman to serve as Principal and Vice-Chancellor (President) of McGill University in 2003. She is a professor at McGill’s Faculty of Medicine and Principal Emerita, and is returning from a leave at Stanford University’s Center for Advanced Studies in the Behavioral Sciences.

 

CASBS Fellow Jon Krosnick: What American People Really Think About Global Warming

in
Date: 
Tue, 06/24/2014

From the Stanford Report:

"The year after temperatures rise, people are more likely to believe in global warming, says Jon Krosnick, a Stanford professor of communication and of political science. The latest polling shows that 73 percent of Americans believe global warming is real and 79 percent favor some sort of government intervention on the issue. But, only 49 percent favor mandates to reduce greenhouse gas emissions by power plants."

Read the entire article.

2014-2015 CASBS Fellow and Mindset Group research in "New York Times Magazine"

in
Date: 
Fri, 05/23/2014

The cover story of the May 18th New York Times Magazine "Who Gets to Graduate?" features the work of incoming fellow David Yeager and the Mindset Group.

"David Yeager, a 32-year-old assistant professor who is emerging as one of the world’s leading experts on the psychology of education. In his research, Yeager is trying to answer the question that Laude wrestles with every day: How, precisely, do you motivate students to take the steps they need to take in order to succeed?"

Read the story.

See the cover and read the story behind the photoshoot.

CASBS Fellow Jon Krosnick wins lifetime achievement award from public opinion research group

in
Date: 
Wed, 05/28/2014

From the "The Dish":

The final tally is in.  JON KROSNICK, a CASBS Fellow, Stanford professor of communication and of political science and, by courtesy, of psychology, has won the 2014 Lifetime Achievement Award by the American Association for Public Opinion Research (AAPOR). Bestowed upon Krosnick on May 17 at the association’s annual banquet in Anaheim, Calif., the tribute recognizes outstanding contributions to public opinion research. Read more.

Hookah Hazard: Paul Blanc’s latest blog post on Psychology Today

in
Date: 
Mon, 05/05/2014

photo of Paul BlancIt’s been trending among hipsters for some time, along with heavy-framed eyeglasses and vinyl records. But unlike those other what’s-old-is-new-again accessories, hookah smoking presents more danger – far more than users may realize.

As Blanc writes in his article for Psychology Today online, “…not only does smoking tobacco in a hookah provide for efficient nicotine delivery, this practice also leads to alarmingly high levels of carbon monoxide” – indeed, more than if they smoked cigarettes.

The reason: the technology design of a hookah, according to Blanc: a layer of burning charcoal rests above the tobacco, adding even more CO to the tobacco as it burns.

“Know thyself.” Not so easy, says CASBS Fellow David Dunning

in
Date: 
Wed, 04/16/2014

David Dunning’s work is featured in three articles across three different media this week: The Christian Science Monitor newspaper, The Atlantic magazine, and the Smart Planet blog. All cite the Dunning-Kruger effect, as it’s known: the tendency to overestimate one’s competence (and as it happens, the less competent someone is, the greater the likelihood of overestimating their abilities).

CASBS Fellow Heather Munroe-Blum Receives Canada’s Top Award in Public Policy

in
Date: 
Fri, 04/11/2014

Above Left to Right; The Hon. Robert Ghiz, Premier of Prince Edward Island; Heather Munroe-Blum; David Mitchell, President and CEO of the Public Policy Forum. Photo Credit: Martin Lipman

"Representation In Scientific Practice Revisited:" A fresh approach to visualization practices in the sciences. Steve Woolgar, ed.

in
Date: 
Thu, 04/03/2014

Editor’s note: Steve Woolgar will present a paper at UC Berkeley on April 10. The paper, “It Could Be Otherwise,” is based on work he is developing at CASBS.

image of book cover: Representation in Scientific Practice RevisitedCASBS Fellow Steve Woolgar is one of the editors of the recently-released Representation in Scientific Practice Revisited. The original Representation in Scientific Practice, was published by the MIT Press in 1990, the work helped coalesce a long-standing interest in scientific visualization among historians, philosophers, and sociologists of science.

Pest Strips: Sure, They Kill Bedbugs – But What Are They doing to Your Family?

in
Date: 
Tue, 04/01/2014

CASBS Fellow Paul Blanc, MD writes a regular online column, Household Hazards, in Psychology Today. This article reports on “pest strips” – whose toxicity extends far beyond the bedbugs and other undesirables they’re intended to kill.

The Centers for Disease Control recently reported on cases of illness not caused by some new super-bug, but rather from a common-enough household product called “pest strips.” These are dichlorvos (DDVP) pesticide-laced (the CDC prefers to say “impregnated”) objects intended to leach out vapors wherever they hang.

Sheri Johnson’s work in The New York Times: some psychiatric disorders related to status seeking

in
Date: 
Wed, 03/12/2014

Sheri Johnson’s work was cited recently in "How Inequality Hollows Out the Soul" in the Opinion pages of The New York Times. From the article:

One of the well-known costs of inequality is that people withdraw from community life and are less likely to feel that they can trust others…. Inequality is divisive and socially corrosive — but that it also damages the individual psyche.

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